Traditional recipes

Turkey Giblet Stock recipe

Turkey Giblet Stock recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Soup
  • Turkey soup

This recipe creates a turkey stock that is far superior than any store-bought variety. Use as you would for any stock.

60 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 750 ml stock

  • 1 neck, giblets and liver from a turkey
  • 1.5 litres water
  • 1 stick celery, sliced
  • 1 carrot, sliced
  • 1 onion, quartered
  • 2 tangerines, zested
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns

MethodPrep:5min ›Cook:1hr30min ›Ready in:1hr35min

  1. In a large saucepan, combine the neck and giblets (excluding the liver), 1.5 litres water, celery, carrot, onion, tangerine zest, bay leaf and peppercorns. Bring mixture to the boil, reduce heat and continue to simmer, skimming the froth occasionally for 1 hour. Add liver and continue to cook at barely a simmer for an additional 30 minutes.
  2. Pass the stock through a fine sieve into a bowl. There should be about 750ml stock. If there is more, simmer the stock until it is reduced to about 750ml; if there is less, add enough water to measure about 750ml.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(53)

Reviews in English (35)

by MACLEOD26

I needed to make a stock in order to get gravy for my deep-fried turkey. This was so easy to make - made the whole house smell wonderful - and also made a tasty gravy.-27 Nov 2005

by DMB4LIFE

I made this for Thanksgiving along with the Awesome Stuffing recipe and it was no fuss...very good. You could tell it was made from scratch! Thanks for sharing.-27 Nov 2004


How to make turkey stock

We’re all on a mission to waste less food and making a flavour-packed stock from your turkey carcass is the ideal way to use up leftovers and get more meals out of one roast. Check out our top 10 turkey leftover recipes for plenty of thrifty meal inspiration.

Turkey stock falls into two categories the first is a stock you make beforehand with the neck, to use as the base for a gravy. The second is a stock you make after cooking with the leftover bones. You would use this as the base for other recipes in the same way you’d use chicken stock, in soups, sauces, stews and risottos. Take a look at our ultimate turkey recipe collection for everything from traditional roasts to curries with a twist.

How to make stock for gravy

If you’re making a stock with the turkey bones, first pick all the meat off the bones and set them aside. You’ll now have cold turkey meat to use in other recipes. The meat can be frozen for up to one month.

Basic stock recipe

A stock can be as basic as turkey bones and water, but a few simple extras can help it along.

  1. Tip the turkey bones and neck (if you have it) into a large saucepan or stock pot.
  2. Add roughly chopped onions, carrots, celery (if you have any), a few whole peppercorns, a sprig of fresh thyme and a bay leaf.
  3. Pour over enough cold water to generously cover all the ingredients.
  4. Bring the stock to the boil, scooping off any froth that forms on the surface, then turn down the heat and simmer everything gently for 3 hrs.
  5. Turn off the heat, leave the stock to cool slightly, then carefully strain into a container. The stock is ready to use, chill or freeze.

How to flavour your stock

The above recipe gives you a good basic stock, but if you want to boost the flavour or give it a deeper colour there are a few things you can do:

  • To concentrate the flavour, the strained stock can be boiled until reduced by half.
  • For a deeper flavoured, darker stock, the bones and vegetables can be roasted until lightly charred before using.

Using up leftover veg

Making stock is a great way of collecting and using up the parts of vegetables you might otherwise throw away. Carrot and onion peelings, celery leaves and parsley stalks can all be added to the stock.

How to make stock in a pressure cooker

Pressure cookers are great at making stock and really extract all the flavour out of the ingredients. Simply follow the basic stock method but cook on medium pressure for 30 mins.

How to make stock in a slow cooker

The joy of using a slow cooker to make stock is that you can just walk away and leave the stock to bubble away gently. Follow the basic stock method and cook on low for 8-10 hrs.

Freezing turkey stock

If you’re not using your stock straightaway, leave it to cool, then it can be chilled for three days or frozen for up to one month. Freeze in usable portions and mark clearly what it is and when it was frozen. Skim off any fat on the top of the stock when cold, as this will help it last longer.

More essential turkey techinques

For a simple step-by-step guide, watch our simple video tutorial how how to make stock.

This easy method works for both chicken and turkey. Want to make the most of your stock? Try making our instant turkey noodle soup or our leftover turkey slaw.


Preparation

Step 1

Cut neck into 1-inch pieces. Halve heart and quarter gizzard. Heat oil in heavy large pot over medium heat. Add neck, heart, gizzard and chicken wings and brown well, stirring frequently, about 15 minutes. Add onions and celery and sauté 5 minutes. Add water and bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook until liquid is reduced to 4 cups, stirring occasionally, about 45 minutes. Strain into bowl. Skim fat from surface of stock. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)

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Step-by- step photos for making Turkey Neck & Giblet Broth

Step 1. Assemble the ingredients:

  • turkey neck and giblets (see photos below for how to remove them from the turkey cavity and neck area)
  • a sprig or two of each of these herbs: sage, rosemary, thyme. (If you don't have all of these, don't worry about--use what you have.)
  • onion
  • celery
  • peppercorns (optional) - view on Amazon
  • chicken broth or water (I prefer to use part or all broth to give it an additional flavor boost but using plain water works fine, too.)

Note: I don't add salt to my broth, because I prefer to add salt later when I'm using it in a recipe. That reduces the risk of over salting.

Where the heck is the neck? Normally, you'll find the neck inside the cavity at the tail end of the turkey.

The bag of giblets is usually stuck under the flap of skin that is covering the neck end of the turkey.

Here's what the individual parts look like. (Not very appealing, are they?) Normally a giblet bag has a gizzard, liver, and heart but this can vary. Once I had a turkey that didn't have a giblet bag at all. This broth recipe is flexible. Just use whatever is included, and your broth will be fine. Even without the giblets, the neck alone made a flavorful broth.

Step 2. To a 1-1/2 to 2 quart pan, add the neck, giblets, herbs, onion, celery, peppercorns, and broth or water.

Step 3. Bring to a boil, lower heat to a simmer, cover and cook for at least 1 hour. It's fine to let it simmer longer than that. I normally leave mine on low on the stove top until I need it.

Step 4. Pour through a mesh metal strainer to remove the solids. Voila, you've got broth!
view on Amazon: wire mesh strainer , 8-cup measuring/mixing bowl

Use now or save for later. The broth can be used right away to flavor gravy or moisten dressing. If you don't need this broth for use in preparing your turkey dinner, save it for making soup later. It can be refrigerated for 3 days or frozen for months. Or, if you don't want to bother with making broth while you're making the rest of the meal, freeze the raw neck and giblets, and save them to use at a later date.

What to do with the cooked giblets that are leftover? Some people like to make giblet gravy. The cooked giblets can either be chopped or pureed and added to gravy. Personally, I'm not wild about giblet gravy, so I throw them away after I've used them to make the broth.

Making this broth is one of those old school methods that has staying power in my kitchen. It's quick, easy, economical, healthy, and flavorful. That's a win in my book.


Recipe Summary

  • Giblets (heart, gizzard, and liver) and neck, reserved from turkey
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 onion, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch cubes
  • 1 rib celery with leaves, stalk cut into 1/4-inch cubes, leaves roughly chopped
  • 1 small leek, trimmed, washed and cut into 1/4-inch cubes
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 dried bay leaf

Trim any fat or membrane from giblets. The liver should not have the gallbladder, a small green sac, attached. If it is, trim off carefully, removing part of the liver if necessary. Do not pierce sac the liquid it contains is very bitter. Rinse giblets and neck pat dry.

In a medium saucepan, melt 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat. Add chopped onions, celery and leaves, and leeks. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are translucent, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper cook another 5 minutes. Add 4 cups water, bay leaf, gizzard, heart, and neck (do not add liver it needs to be cooked separately or it makes the stock bitter). Bring to a boil, then reduce to simmer. Cook for 45 minutes, or until gizzard is tender when pierced with the tip of a knife.

Meanwhile, chop the liver finely. Melt remaining tablespoon of butter in a small skillet over medium-low heat. Add liver and cook, stirring constantly, 4 to 6 minutes, until liver no longer releases any blood and is fully cooked. Set aside.

After 45 minutes of simmering, the liquid should reduce to about 2 1/2 cups. If it has not, increase the heat and cook another 10 to 15 minutes.

Strain broth. Chop gizzard and heart very fine and add to strained broth along with chopped liver. Pick meat off neck and add to broth. Set aside until needed for gravy.


Homemade Turkey Stock

An easy homemade turkey broth perfect for soups and stews.

I like to use a large-size slow cooker for this but a large stock pot or soup kettle can be used instead. Just be sure to watch the water level if using anything other than a slow cooker to be sure that bones remain covered with liquid.

The stock is flavored by whatever stuffing or aromatics have been placed inside the turkey during roasting. If I'm in a hurry and don't want to deal with stuffing, I like to use some aromatics loosely placed inside of a raw turkey that has been rinsed out and patted dry with a clean towel. Coat the inside with Kosher salt, coarsely ground black pepper and ground cinnamon (or use a couple cinnamon sticks) then loosely place some quartered onions, chunks of sweet raw carrots, celery cut into 4 inch pieces, leek, and a red apple or two that has been quartered and cored into both the front breast cavity and the main body cavity of the turkey. Roast however you prefer. I like to preheat my oven to 500 degrees F. and put the turkey in a roasting pan on the lowest rack. Make a tent out of aluminum foil to put over the breast portion only. Roast for 30 minutes at 500 degrees. Reduce heat to 350 degrees and continue roasting, basting every 30 minutes until meat thermometer registers 161 degrees F. Turn off oven and let turkey sit until temperature reaches 180 degrees F. (Turkey will continue to cook even with oven turned off.) This makes a beautifully browned,moist and tender turkey with lovely pan drippings to use for this stock recipe.
An easy homemade turkey broth perfect for soups and stews.

I like to use a large-size slow cooker for this but a large stock pot or soup kettle can be used instead. Just be sure to watch the water level if using anything other than a slow cooker to be sure that bones remain covered with liquid.

The stock is flavored by whatever stuffing or aromatics have been placed inside the turkey during roasting. If I'm in a hurry and don't want to deal with stuffing, I like to use some aromatics loosely placed inside of a raw turkey that has been rinsed out and patted dry with a clean towel. Coat the inside with Kosher salt, coarsely ground black pepper and ground cinnamon (or use a couple cinnamon sticks) then loosely place some quartered onions, chunks of sweet raw carrots, celery cut into 4 inch pieces, leek, and a red apple or two that has been quartered and cored into both the front breast cavity and the main body cavity of the turkey. Roast however you prefer. I like to preheat my oven to 500 degrees F. and put the turkey in a roasting pan on the lowest rack. Make a tent out of aluminum foil to put over the breast portion only. Roast for 30 minutes at 500 degrees. Reduce heat to 350 degrees and continue roasting, basting every 30 minutes until meat thermometer registers 161 degrees F. Turn off oven and let turkey sit until temperature reaches 180 degrees F. (Turkey will continue to cook even with oven turned off.) This makes a beautifully browned,moist and tender turkey with lovely pan drippings to use for this stock recipe.


Heat the drippings in a 3-quart saucepan over medium-high heat.  Add the onion and cook for 5 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally.

Reduce the heat to low.  Add the flour to the saucepan and cook and whisk for 8 minutes or until the mixture is a light brown color.

Stir in the thyme and poultry seasoning.  Increase the heat to medium.  Whisk in the broth and heat to a boil.  Cook and whisk until the gravy is thickened.  Season to taste.  Whisk again before serving.


  • 1 (12 to 14 pound) turkey, thawed if frozen
  • 1 ½ tablespoons kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil
  • 8 cups water, plus more as needed
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 large carrot, chopped
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • ¼ cup instant flour, such as Wondra

Remove giblets and neck from turkey cavity set aside in the refrigerator for Step 4. (Discard liver or freeze for another use.) Place the turkey in a large roasting pan and pat dry with paper towels. Rub salt all over the turkey, including inside the cavity. Refrigerate, breast-side up and uncovered, for 24 hours.

Position rack in lower third of oven preheat to 500 degrees F.

Set a rack in the pan and place the turkey on it, breast-side up. Brush the turkey with oil. Transfer to the oven and reduce the temperature to 325 degrees F. Roast the turkey until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast and the innermost part of the thigh registers 165 degrees F, 2 to 2 1/2 hours.

Meanwhile, combine water, celery, onion, carrot, bay leaves and thyme with the reserved giblets and neck in a large saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Reduce heat to maintain a bare simmer and cook, uncovered and skimming occasionally, until the stock is well flavored, about 2 hours. Remove from heat and pour the stock through a sieve into a large measuring cup. (Discard the solids.) If necessary, add enough water to make 3 cups.

Transfer the turkey to a large cutting board and tent loosely with foil. To prepare gravy, carefully pour the drippings from the roasting pan into a fat separator, leaving about 2 tablespoons of drippings in the pan. Set the pan over 2 burners on medium heat. Add 1 cup of the stock and cook, scraping up any browned bits with a wooden spoon, until the liquid is slightly reduced, about 1 minute. Add flour and cook, stirring constantly, until thickened, about 2 minutes. Add the remaining 2 cups stock and the defatted drippings cook, stirring occasionally, until the gravy is thick and smooth, about 5 minutes. Strain the gravy through a fine-mesh sieve.


  • 1 whole turkey, neck and giblets reserved, about 10 to 12 pounds (see note)
  • 12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) butter, divided
  • 1/2 cup finely minced parsley leaves
  • 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh thyme leaves (or 2 teaspoons dried thyme)
  • 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh sage leaves
  • 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh rosemary leaves
  • 2 medium garlic, minced or grated on microplane (about 2 teaspoons)
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 large onion, roughly chopped
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, roughly chopped
  • 1 1/2 quarts homemade or store-bought low-sodium chicken stock
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon marmite
  • 1/4 cup flour

Set oven rack to lowest position and place a baking stone or Baking Steel on it. Preheat oven to 500°F. Allow to preheat for at least 45 minutes before adding turkey. Meanwhile, rinse turkey and carefully pat dry with paper towels. Set a V-rack into a rimmed baking sheet.

Heat 8 tablespoons butter in small skillet or microwave until just melted (it should bubble). Transfer to a medium bowl. Whisk in parsley, thyme, sage, rosemary, garlic, and a generous amount of salt and pepper. Rub mixture evenly all over skin of bird (it should harden and clump a bit as it hits the cold bird).

Place bird on rack and transfer directly to the baking stone. Immediately close oven and reduce oven temperature to 300°F. Roast until golden brown and deepest part of breast registers 150°F on an instant read thermometer and legs register at least 165°F, 3 to 4 hours total, basting occasionally with browned butter from bottom of pan.

While turkey is roasting, chop neck into 1-inch chunks with cleaver. Heat oil in medium saucepan over high heat until smoking. Add turkey neck, onions, carrots, and celery and cook, stirring occasionally, until well browned, about 10 minutes total. Add stock, bay leaves, soy sauce, and marmite. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer. Simmer for 1 hour then strain through fine mesh strainer. You should have a little over a quart of fortified stock. If not, add water or more chicken stock to equal 1 quart. Discard solids and set stock aside.

After turkey is cooked, transfer V-rack back to clean rimmed baking sheet. Pour hot melted butter from bottom of pan over turkey. Tent with foil and allow to rest for at least 30 minutes before carving. Meanwhile, set pan over burner and add fortified stock. Scrape up browned bits with wooden spoon. Pour stock through fine mesh strainer set in 1 quart glass measure.

Finely chop turkey gizzard and liver (if desired). Melt remaining 4 tablespoons butter in medium saucepan. Add chopped giblets and cook, stirring frequently, until just cooked through, about 1 minute. Add flour and cook, stirring constantly until golden brown, about 3 minutes. Whisking constantly, add broth in thin steady stream. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until thickened and reduced to about 3 cups. Season to taste with salt and pepper.


Turkey Recipes - Terrific Turkey Giblet Broth

Don't throw away the neck and giblets that come with your turkey. They can be turned into a tasty broth that makes terrific gravy. Giblets are full of rich flavor and can add great complexity to your turkey broth. Th giblet bag includes a heart, liver, gizzard (part of the stomach), and neck. The liver should not be used for broth, because it will make it bitter. You can saute, chop, or add the liver to stuffing or to the finished gravy.

Terrific Turkey Giblet Broth
Yields 3 1/2 Cups

Turkey neck, gizzard, tail, and heart (do not include liver)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 large onion, cut into 2-inch chunks
kosher salt
4 cups water
1 small carrot, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 rib celery, cut into 2-inch pieces
1 bay leaf
2 large sprigs each fresh thyme and flat-leaf parsley
8 to 10 black peppercorns

1. Chop the turkey neck into 3 to 4 pieces with a cleaver. Chop the gizzard in half.

2. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium-low heat. Add the turkey neck, gizzard, tail, and heart along with the onion and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Stir to coat with oil, cover, and cook gently for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally the meat will release lots of juice.

3. Add the water, carrot, celery, bay leaf, thyme, parsley, and peppercorns. Bring to a boil, cover, and reduce heat to maintain a gentle simmer.

4. Simmer until the broth is flavorful, 30 to 40 minutes. Straw the broth and use immediately or let cool. Pick the meat from the neck and tail to add to the gravy along with the chopped gizzard and heart, if necessary.

Be sure to visit our food creation and recipe website for more turkey recipes and other helpful food tips and instructions.


Place neck, heart and gizzard in a medium (3 to 4 quart) saucepan. Add water, carrot, celery, onion, bay leaf, thyme, salt and peppercorns. Over high heat, bring to a boil.

Then reduce heat to low, skimming any foam that rises to the top. Cover partially with the lid and simmer for about an hour and 15 minutes or until giblets and neck meat are very tender. Add reserved liver to pan, if using, and cook an additional 10 to 15 minutes, depending on size of liver.

Remove the pan from the heat and let the broth cool slightly. Then strain the broth over a large bowl. Remove the giblets, neck and liver from the strainer, set aside and cool to room temperature. Once cool, remove meat from the neck and discard the bones. Coarsely chop the neck meat, giblets and liver, place in a container and refrigerate until ready to use.