Traditional recipes

The Newly Reopened Dirt Candy Will Now Serve a Vegetable Lovers Brunch

The Newly Reopened Dirt Candy Will Now Serve a Vegetable Lovers Brunch

Amanda Cohen’s Dirt Candy will offer a brand-new brunch menu starting September 12

Beet coffee crumb cake and carrot granola are two of the brunch menu items.

We usually only enjoy vegetables at brunch if they’re in Bloody Mary form, but we’ll make an exception for Dirt Candy.Amanda Cohen’s vegetable-centric Dirt Candy, which just reopened this February in a much larger space in New York’s East Village, will introduce a brunch menu this fall. Starting September 12, chef Cohen will premiere a menu of never-before-seen brunch dishes and cocktails.

Indulge in specialty brunch drinks like a yellow pepper mimosa (prosecco and yellow pepper juice) and the Bloody Carrie (bloody mary with grilled carrot and mezcal). Edibles include fennel walnut sticky buns, beet coffee cake, and pain au chocolate et à l'oignon; zucchini pancakes with squash blossom jam; corn French toast with yellow corn jelly and bourbon corn butter; "Green Huevos No Ham" with chard tortillas with salsa verde, cotija cheese, and tempura poached eggs; and carrot granola with carrot marmalade and labneh.

Brunch will be served on Saturdays and Sundays from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.


Chioggia Beets

Chioggia Beets, an heirloom variety originating in Chioggia Italy, are also called Candy Cane Beets because of their unusual red and white stripes. They are slightly sweeter and milder than their traditional red cousins. They immigrated to the US in the 1840’s and you can mostly find them in CSA’s or Farmers Markets.

They lose some of the stripping when cooked. You can use them the same way you use regular beets, boiled roasted, turn them into pickled beets, etc.

I love roasting red beets. To me, roasting really enhances the sweetness of the beet. I slice them and toss them with greens, goat cheese and some sort of vinaigrette. I know a lot of folks like the beets with a raspberry vinaigrette, the earthiness of the beets plays well against the sweetness of the raspberries. I prefer a lemon vinaigrette, I love the play of the tart lemon, creamy goat cheese and earthy beets, but that is just me. I like to add chopped walnuts for crunch!

My husband is not a fan of red beets, to him, all he can taste is a mouthful of dirt. I get they are an earthy tasting vegetable but maybe because I grew up eating them, I learned to love them at an early age?

If he isn’t home, I will peel beets, boil them and toss them with a bit of butter for a side dish. Another of my favorite ways to eat beets is pickled. I bought a half bushel at the farm stand and will be pickling them later in the week. Hopefully I will have enough left over brine to make some pickled eggs but that is a whole ‘nother post!


Chioggia Beets

Chioggia Beets, an heirloom variety originating in Chioggia Italy, are also called Candy Cane Beets because of their unusual red and white stripes. They are slightly sweeter and milder than their traditional red cousins. They immigrated to the US in the 1840’s and you can mostly find them in CSA’s or Farmers Markets.

They lose some of the stripping when cooked. You can use them the same way you use regular beets, boiled roasted, turn them into pickled beets, etc.

I love roasting red beets. To me, roasting really enhances the sweetness of the beet. I slice them and toss them with greens, goat cheese and some sort of vinaigrette. I know a lot of folks like the beets with a raspberry vinaigrette, the earthiness of the beets plays well against the sweetness of the raspberries. I prefer a lemon vinaigrette, I love the play of the tart lemon, creamy goat cheese and earthy beets, but that is just me. I like to add chopped walnuts for crunch!

My husband is not a fan of red beets, to him, all he can taste is a mouthful of dirt. I get they are an earthy tasting vegetable but maybe because I grew up eating them, I learned to love them at an early age?

If he isn’t home, I will peel beets, boil them and toss them with a bit of butter for a side dish. Another of my favorite ways to eat beets is pickled. I bought a half bushel at the farm stand and will be pickling them later in the week. Hopefully I will have enough left over brine to make some pickled eggs but that is a whole ‘nother post!


Chioggia Beets

Chioggia Beets, an heirloom variety originating in Chioggia Italy, are also called Candy Cane Beets because of their unusual red and white stripes. They are slightly sweeter and milder than their traditional red cousins. They immigrated to the US in the 1840’s and you can mostly find them in CSA’s or Farmers Markets.

They lose some of the stripping when cooked. You can use them the same way you use regular beets, boiled roasted, turn them into pickled beets, etc.

I love roasting red beets. To me, roasting really enhances the sweetness of the beet. I slice them and toss them with greens, goat cheese and some sort of vinaigrette. I know a lot of folks like the beets with a raspberry vinaigrette, the earthiness of the beets plays well against the sweetness of the raspberries. I prefer a lemon vinaigrette, I love the play of the tart lemon, creamy goat cheese and earthy beets, but that is just me. I like to add chopped walnuts for crunch!

My husband is not a fan of red beets, to him, all he can taste is a mouthful of dirt. I get they are an earthy tasting vegetable but maybe because I grew up eating them, I learned to love them at an early age?

If he isn’t home, I will peel beets, boil them and toss them with a bit of butter for a side dish. Another of my favorite ways to eat beets is pickled. I bought a half bushel at the farm stand and will be pickling them later in the week. Hopefully I will have enough left over brine to make some pickled eggs but that is a whole ‘nother post!


Chioggia Beets

Chioggia Beets, an heirloom variety originating in Chioggia Italy, are also called Candy Cane Beets because of their unusual red and white stripes. They are slightly sweeter and milder than their traditional red cousins. They immigrated to the US in the 1840’s and you can mostly find them in CSA’s or Farmers Markets.

They lose some of the stripping when cooked. You can use them the same way you use regular beets, boiled roasted, turn them into pickled beets, etc.

I love roasting red beets. To me, roasting really enhances the sweetness of the beet. I slice them and toss them with greens, goat cheese and some sort of vinaigrette. I know a lot of folks like the beets with a raspberry vinaigrette, the earthiness of the beets plays well against the sweetness of the raspberries. I prefer a lemon vinaigrette, I love the play of the tart lemon, creamy goat cheese and earthy beets, but that is just me. I like to add chopped walnuts for crunch!

My husband is not a fan of red beets, to him, all he can taste is a mouthful of dirt. I get they are an earthy tasting vegetable but maybe because I grew up eating them, I learned to love them at an early age?

If he isn’t home, I will peel beets, boil them and toss them with a bit of butter for a side dish. Another of my favorite ways to eat beets is pickled. I bought a half bushel at the farm stand and will be pickling them later in the week. Hopefully I will have enough left over brine to make some pickled eggs but that is a whole ‘nother post!


Chioggia Beets

Chioggia Beets, an heirloom variety originating in Chioggia Italy, are also called Candy Cane Beets because of their unusual red and white stripes. They are slightly sweeter and milder than their traditional red cousins. They immigrated to the US in the 1840’s and you can mostly find them in CSA’s or Farmers Markets.

They lose some of the stripping when cooked. You can use them the same way you use regular beets, boiled roasted, turn them into pickled beets, etc.

I love roasting red beets. To me, roasting really enhances the sweetness of the beet. I slice them and toss them with greens, goat cheese and some sort of vinaigrette. I know a lot of folks like the beets with a raspberry vinaigrette, the earthiness of the beets plays well against the sweetness of the raspberries. I prefer a lemon vinaigrette, I love the play of the tart lemon, creamy goat cheese and earthy beets, but that is just me. I like to add chopped walnuts for crunch!

My husband is not a fan of red beets, to him, all he can taste is a mouthful of dirt. I get they are an earthy tasting vegetable but maybe because I grew up eating them, I learned to love them at an early age?

If he isn’t home, I will peel beets, boil them and toss them with a bit of butter for a side dish. Another of my favorite ways to eat beets is pickled. I bought a half bushel at the farm stand and will be pickling them later in the week. Hopefully I will have enough left over brine to make some pickled eggs but that is a whole ‘nother post!


Chioggia Beets

Chioggia Beets, an heirloom variety originating in Chioggia Italy, are also called Candy Cane Beets because of their unusual red and white stripes. They are slightly sweeter and milder than their traditional red cousins. They immigrated to the US in the 1840’s and you can mostly find them in CSA’s or Farmers Markets.

They lose some of the stripping when cooked. You can use them the same way you use regular beets, boiled roasted, turn them into pickled beets, etc.

I love roasting red beets. To me, roasting really enhances the sweetness of the beet. I slice them and toss them with greens, goat cheese and some sort of vinaigrette. I know a lot of folks like the beets with a raspberry vinaigrette, the earthiness of the beets plays well against the sweetness of the raspberries. I prefer a lemon vinaigrette, I love the play of the tart lemon, creamy goat cheese and earthy beets, but that is just me. I like to add chopped walnuts for crunch!

My husband is not a fan of red beets, to him, all he can taste is a mouthful of dirt. I get they are an earthy tasting vegetable but maybe because I grew up eating them, I learned to love them at an early age?

If he isn’t home, I will peel beets, boil them and toss them with a bit of butter for a side dish. Another of my favorite ways to eat beets is pickled. I bought a half bushel at the farm stand and will be pickling them later in the week. Hopefully I will have enough left over brine to make some pickled eggs but that is a whole ‘nother post!


Chioggia Beets

Chioggia Beets, an heirloom variety originating in Chioggia Italy, are also called Candy Cane Beets because of their unusual red and white stripes. They are slightly sweeter and milder than their traditional red cousins. They immigrated to the US in the 1840’s and you can mostly find them in CSA’s or Farmers Markets.

They lose some of the stripping when cooked. You can use them the same way you use regular beets, boiled roasted, turn them into pickled beets, etc.

I love roasting red beets. To me, roasting really enhances the sweetness of the beet. I slice them and toss them with greens, goat cheese and some sort of vinaigrette. I know a lot of folks like the beets with a raspberry vinaigrette, the earthiness of the beets plays well against the sweetness of the raspberries. I prefer a lemon vinaigrette, I love the play of the tart lemon, creamy goat cheese and earthy beets, but that is just me. I like to add chopped walnuts for crunch!

My husband is not a fan of red beets, to him, all he can taste is a mouthful of dirt. I get they are an earthy tasting vegetable but maybe because I grew up eating them, I learned to love them at an early age?

If he isn’t home, I will peel beets, boil them and toss them with a bit of butter for a side dish. Another of my favorite ways to eat beets is pickled. I bought a half bushel at the farm stand and will be pickling them later in the week. Hopefully I will have enough left over brine to make some pickled eggs but that is a whole ‘nother post!


Chioggia Beets

Chioggia Beets, an heirloom variety originating in Chioggia Italy, are also called Candy Cane Beets because of their unusual red and white stripes. They are slightly sweeter and milder than their traditional red cousins. They immigrated to the US in the 1840’s and you can mostly find them in CSA’s or Farmers Markets.

They lose some of the stripping when cooked. You can use them the same way you use regular beets, boiled roasted, turn them into pickled beets, etc.

I love roasting red beets. To me, roasting really enhances the sweetness of the beet. I slice them and toss them with greens, goat cheese and some sort of vinaigrette. I know a lot of folks like the beets with a raspberry vinaigrette, the earthiness of the beets plays well against the sweetness of the raspberries. I prefer a lemon vinaigrette, I love the play of the tart lemon, creamy goat cheese and earthy beets, but that is just me. I like to add chopped walnuts for crunch!

My husband is not a fan of red beets, to him, all he can taste is a mouthful of dirt. I get they are an earthy tasting vegetable but maybe because I grew up eating them, I learned to love them at an early age?

If he isn’t home, I will peel beets, boil them and toss them with a bit of butter for a side dish. Another of my favorite ways to eat beets is pickled. I bought a half bushel at the farm stand and will be pickling them later in the week. Hopefully I will have enough left over brine to make some pickled eggs but that is a whole ‘nother post!


Chioggia Beets

Chioggia Beets, an heirloom variety originating in Chioggia Italy, are also called Candy Cane Beets because of their unusual red and white stripes. They are slightly sweeter and milder than their traditional red cousins. They immigrated to the US in the 1840’s and you can mostly find them in CSA’s or Farmers Markets.

They lose some of the stripping when cooked. You can use them the same way you use regular beets, boiled roasted, turn them into pickled beets, etc.

I love roasting red beets. To me, roasting really enhances the sweetness of the beet. I slice them and toss them with greens, goat cheese and some sort of vinaigrette. I know a lot of folks like the beets with a raspberry vinaigrette, the earthiness of the beets plays well against the sweetness of the raspberries. I prefer a lemon vinaigrette, I love the play of the tart lemon, creamy goat cheese and earthy beets, but that is just me. I like to add chopped walnuts for crunch!

My husband is not a fan of red beets, to him, all he can taste is a mouthful of dirt. I get they are an earthy tasting vegetable but maybe because I grew up eating them, I learned to love them at an early age?

If he isn’t home, I will peel beets, boil them and toss them with a bit of butter for a side dish. Another of my favorite ways to eat beets is pickled. I bought a half bushel at the farm stand and will be pickling them later in the week. Hopefully I will have enough left over brine to make some pickled eggs but that is a whole ‘nother post!


Chioggia Beets

Chioggia Beets, an heirloom variety originating in Chioggia Italy, are also called Candy Cane Beets because of their unusual red and white stripes. They are slightly sweeter and milder than their traditional red cousins. They immigrated to the US in the 1840’s and you can mostly find them in CSA’s or Farmers Markets.

They lose some of the stripping when cooked. You can use them the same way you use regular beets, boiled roasted, turn them into pickled beets, etc.

I love roasting red beets. To me, roasting really enhances the sweetness of the beet. I slice them and toss them with greens, goat cheese and some sort of vinaigrette. I know a lot of folks like the beets with a raspberry vinaigrette, the earthiness of the beets plays well against the sweetness of the raspberries. I prefer a lemon vinaigrette, I love the play of the tart lemon, creamy goat cheese and earthy beets, but that is just me. I like to add chopped walnuts for crunch!

My husband is not a fan of red beets, to him, all he can taste is a mouthful of dirt. I get they are an earthy tasting vegetable but maybe because I grew up eating them, I learned to love them at an early age?

If he isn’t home, I will peel beets, boil them and toss them with a bit of butter for a side dish. Another of my favorite ways to eat beets is pickled. I bought a half bushel at the farm stand and will be pickling them later in the week. Hopefully I will have enough left over brine to make some pickled eggs but that is a whole ‘nother post!